• Zuhair Bakdoud

    Physician, Washington, D.C, U.S.A.

    "We must endeavour to keep the hand in that (natural) position at all times, moving it along quickly and easily to the next position – 'displacing' it from one group of notes to the next. That is one of the basic secrets of piano technique"
    I instantly went to my piano and tried Chopin's # 1 Etude in C major using this displacing of the hand to the next position without stretching: It was a MIRACLE!!!!!!!!. It worked like a DREAM: No tension, no stiffening, no tiring of my hand... It felt so easy, so non-straining. I could go on playing the piano using this principle for ever without feeling any stiffening, etc. God must have spoken to you when you discovered this phenomenon. My gratitude to you is INFINITE. I cannot wait to read the rest of the advice you have in your book on piano technique.
    Since I am a physician (neonatologist), your applying anatomy and physiology to explaining piano technique is a total BLESSING: It makes the principle easy to understand.

    P.S. "Displacement", among other things I learnt from your book WORKS, every time – thanks. zu

  • Stephen Haller

    American Record Guide

    One of the finest recordings Jarvi and the Detroit Symphony have given us; in effect, it may be considered Rachmaninoff's Fifth Piano Concerto in all but name, for there is no question that it is worthy to stand beside the four concertos the Master left us . . . Kogosowski has recreated the very special orchestral sound of Rachmaninoff . . . This record immediately goes to the very top of my 'Best of the Year' list.

  • Tore G. Christensen, Norway

    I have studied your book about how to play Chopin. It gave me so much good advice about playing Chopin on the piano . . . I have been practicing this now for a while, and I've got an even better understanding of Chopin's music! Thank you so much for giving me this help! I am most grateful to you!